No-Risk, Zero-Stress Concrete Leveling In Littleton, CO

Here Is Why Foam Leveling Provides A Better, Longer-Lasting Result Than Mudjacking

Are you in need of concrete leveling in the Littleton, CO area? If so, you may be wondering whether foam leveling or mudjacking is better for your situation. Though both have advantages over concrete replacement (which can be very pricey, disruptive, and time consuming), foam leveling and mudjacking differ in several key areas. Mudjacking involves liquid-grout slurry (usually dirt, cement, and sand) that is pumped beneath sunken concrete. This mixture lifts the sunken concrete with hydraulic pressure. Foam leveling injects polyurethane foam into the concrete’s foundation. The foam is pushed under the slab at high pressure before it expands to support the foundation. Let’s take a look at how foam leveling and mudjacking compare in a few important categories:

Durability

Mudjacking: The slurry mix used in mudjacking holds up well initially, but it tends to deteriorate. Deterioration can accelerate if the concrete is load-bearing and handles a lot of heavy weight. Another potential problem is the weight of the slurry. The slurry mixture is very heavy—as much as 100lbs per cubic foot. The weight of the slurry can add a lot of stress to poorly prepped soil, causing the concrete to settle and crack.

Foam Leveling: Polyurethane foam never loses its density and can withstand extreme weights and use. It is a great solution for leveling load-bearing concrete. And despite being much stronger than mudjacking slurry, polyurethane foam is 2lb to 4lb per cubic foot—25 to 50 times lighter than mudjacking slurry.

Verdict: Foam is a much stronger material for leveling sunken concrete than the slurry used in mudjacking. If you have load-bearing concrete or want a lifetime solution, foam is the clear-cut solution.

Convenience

Mudjacking: Many mudjacking projects can be completed in one to two hours. Large projects may take up to a day. The slurry mixture used in mudjacking takes about one to two days to dry once it is injected, so you have to wait until then to utilize the concrete.

Foam Leveling: Like mudjacking, foam leveling takes about one to two hours for most jobs. The big difference is that polyurethane foam cures in as little as 15 minutes. You will experience zero down time with foam leveling.

Verdict: If you can withstand a day or two of downtime, mudjacking is a solid choice. But if you’re looking for a fast, non-invasive solution for your uneven concrete in Littleton, CO, foam leveling is hands-down the better option.

Looks

Mudjacking: Many holes (about two inches in diameter) are required to completely and evenly fill the space under the concrete. Since the holes are so large, patching jobs may be noticeable.

Foam Leveling: Polyurethane foam requires fewer and smaller holes (only about five-eighths of an inch, compared to mudjacking’s two-inch holes) because the foam expands once it is injected under the concrete. The small size and limited number of holes makes the patch job almost completely unnoticeable.

Verdict: If you want your concrete to maintain a pleasant appearance, foam leveling is the better option. It requires fewer and smaller holes than mudjacking, so the patching work is nearly invisible.

Why Choose CreteJack For Foam Concrete Leveling In Littleton

  • Ironclad Quotes: Our quotes are 100% firm and accurate; the price we quote you is the price you pay.
  • No Pressure: You won’t experience arm-twisting, pricing games, or any sort of sales pressure. You are the decision maker.
  • No Deposits: We don’t take ANY payment of any kind up front. No deposit, no fees, no anything. It’s our way of ensuring you get exactly what you pay for.

Book Your Quote Today

Contact us today to get a free, ironclad quote on foam concrete leveling in Littleton. We promise to keep everything simple—no sales pressure or pricing games nonsense. We’ll provide you with the clear-cut answers you need and our expert recommendation on what we believe is the best solution.

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